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LSAMP Early Arrival Program: Home

Guide for Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) scholars participating in the LSAMP Early Arrival Program.

Welcome LSAMP scholars! The Miami University Libraries is here to support students participating in the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation Early Arrival Program. Resources on this guide will be useful as LSAMP students conduct research related to the assigned research problem, as well as throughout students' transitions to college in the first year. 

The Research Process

The research process is a repeating cycle, both for individuals and for communities. It's very much like the scientific method.

Origin ► Planning & Design ► Data Gathering ► Data Analysis ► Results ► Reporting ► Origin

  • Origin: come up with an idea
  • Planning and Designing: figure out a strategy for conducting the research and doing literature reviews
  • Data Gathering: locate or collect data or information, including previous research in the form of articles
  • Data Analysis: look at your collected data to see what it reveals - may decide you need to do more data gathering
  • Results: compiling the data analysis and begin the writing process
  • Reporting: writing process is fully underway, remember to cite your sources

Keep in mind as you move through the research process that it's not rigid. Things don't always go smoothly or as expected, and that's fine; sometimes researchers need to go back to previous stages and revise things or search for more data or sources.

Literature Reviews and Search Strategies

Literature Reviews

Here's what's useful about doing a literature review:

  • Confirmation of need
  • Establishment of focus
  • Identification of specific subject and context 
  • Identification of theoretical base
  • Identification of methodological base

So, how does one conduct a literature review? Basically go find relevant resources; it helps to have a plan for this though.

Search Strategies

Effective search strategies require persistence, adaptability and flexibility. 
The best place to start is articulating search terms for your research.

  1. In a sentence or two, articulate your central topic
  2. Take your sentences from above and break them down into broad concepts
  3. For each concept or topic, identify synonyms or related terms - it helps to work with others on this

After step three, you now have some terms to be your keywords, which can be combined in different ways to pull up search results that are relevant to your research. You might discover additional terms during your searching.

Suggested Resources

STEM Resources

Research Area Databases
Science Web of Science; Engineering Village (GeoBase); Science Direct Topics [website]
Engineering Engineering Village (Compendex); IEEE Xplore; Knovel
Medicine PubMed; Web of ScienceVisible Body Human Anatomy Atlas, Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, Internet of Things (IoT) for Medicine [ebook]

Using STEM databases for business research

Frequently there is helpful information in the article itself. Author affiliations are generally at the top. Funding information is generally near the bottom, sometimes in the acknowledgement section.

This can give you an idea of the type and quantity of research a company fund and or conducts themselves.

Some databases actually let you do searches by author affiliations and or funding agency, so be on the lookout for those options in the search or in the limiter/filter after the search.

Business Resources

This is not an exhaustive list of business resources, but will help get you started.

Research Type Databases
Consumer research Mediamark; Mintel; Statista; SimplyAnalytics
Industry research IBISWorld; MarketLine; Key Business Ratios
Company research (SWOT analyses) Hoover's; MarketLine; Business Source Complete
Advertising information AdSpender; SRDS; Statista
Finance information Value Line; Mergent; WRDS
International research MarketLine; Statista

 

How to use Databases

While there are some commonalities between databases, each have unique interfaces and functionalities. Checkout our video series, for business and STEM resources, to see an overview of these different databases.

Writing and Citing

It's important to cite your sources

Using someone else's idea without giving them credit is considered plagiarism and academic dishonesty.  This can have serious consequences. Fortunately, it's really easy to avoid.  Cite your sources. Cite all of them - not just textual, but any images, graphs, videos, audio recordings, or data you use. One reason college students are taught this is because it's expected in the professional academic publishing world too. So, it's advisable to think critically and pay attention to citations when you are evaluating the research of others. 

Student Success Librarian

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Laura Birkenhauer
Contact:
214 King Library
513-529-4148
Contact: Twitter Page
Subjects: Military Studies

Science and Engineering Librarian

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Kristen Adams

If you have questions or need help with research, please contact me at adamsk3@miamioh.edu.

To schedule an online meeting through Webex, Zoom, or GoogleMeet, please email me and let me know your preference.

Contact:
209 King Library
513-529-0506

Science Librarian

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Ginny Boehme

My appointment scheduler is open for you to meet with me virtually. The default platform I use is Zoom, but if you prefer Google Meet or WebEx, that's not a problem at all.


Contact:
202 King Library
513-529-1726

Computing and Engineering Librarian

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Matt Benzing
Contact:
207 King Library
(513) 529-7203