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ENG 109 Johnson (Hamilton): Finding Pro/Con Resources

Opposing Viewpoints

Opposing Viewpoints
You'll need to enter your Miami Unique ID and password to access this resource from off-campus.

You can enter your keywords in the search box or click on "Browse Issues" to browse topics.

On the results page, focus on the boxes titled "Featured Viewpoints" and "Viewpoints". Click on the category title to view all of the viewpoints in that category.

Click on the title to view the full text of the article.

 

At the top of each article, you will see options to:
-get the citation information (make sure it says "MLA 8th edition" at the top of the pop-up window),
-email the article to yourself,
-download the article to save to your flash drive or computer,
-print,
-get a link to get back to this article.

 

CQ Researcher

CQ Researcher
You'll need to enter your Miami Unique ID and password to access this resource from off-campus.

screenshot of CQ Researcher report sections

Enter your keywords in the search box at the top of the page, or browse topics by clicking on "Browse Topics".

 

 

On the left-hand side of each report is a list of all the sections. You can read the entire report, or click on a section heading to jump to that section. The "Pro/Con" section will be particularly helpful for your assignment.

 

 

At the top of each report, you'll see options to:
-view the PDF,
-get the citation information (make sure  you select "MLA" in the pop-up window),
-print,
-email,
-save.
All of these options are for the full article, or a section of the report. (So, you can print or email just the "Pro/Con" section if you would like.)

Search Tips

“And”, “Or”, “Not” (Boolean Operators): Use the words to narrow or expand your search results. For Example:

  • “automobiles” AND “accidents” will return results that contain BOTH of the terms.
  • “juvenile” OR “adolescent” OR “teenager” will return results that contain at least one of the terms. Useful for words with similar meanings.
  • “cinderella” NOT “rock band” will return results that do NOT include the 1980’s rock band, Cinderella.

Use an * at the end of a root word to find all variations of that word. For example, “child*” will search for “child,” “children,” “childhood,” and “children's.”

Brainstorm words or concepts that are similar in meaning and use those as search terms. If you find a good resource, look at the “Subject Headings” or “Descriptors” listed and use those as additional search terms.

Bibliographies/References/Works Cited pages are great ways to find additional resources. You can search the library’s Catalogs and/or Databases.